Water loving weeds in lawns and pastures By Mario Villarino - Ksst Radio

Water loving weeds in lawns and pastures By Mario Villarino

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Last week I share some information related to moisture loving weeds known as buttercups and Senecio. Another common weed in wet lawns and pastures are the Kyllingas. During a recent field day in Sulphur Bluff I notice even waterlogged pastures covered with them. According to North Carolina Extension, green kyllinga and false green kyllinga are very similar in appearance, and both are referred to as green kyllinga. Both species are native to Asia and are spreading rapidly in turfgrasses in the southern United States. Both are perennial species with well-developed rhizomes. Kyllingas tend to have a finer leaf texture and are shorter growing than other sedges. They thrive under close mowing situations (inch or less) and are very prolific in areas that are poorly drained or frequently wet. These two species are mat-forming sedges and have been observed to take over turfgrasses in the southeastern United States. Green kyllinga is very difficult to control once the large mats form. The range of these two species is somewhat misleading because they are spreading rapidly. It is believed that spread of these two species may be due to a change in crabgrass control practices in recent years. Green kyllinga and false green kyllinga are both perennials that tend to thrive under close mowing (inch or less) and are very prolific in areas that are poorly drained or frequently wet. Green kyllinga is very difficult to control once the large mats tend to form. There are several chemical recommendations to help control Kyllingas. Please call the Hopkins County Extension Office for more details.

Coming Up:

The Northeast Texas Beef Improvement Organization (NETBIO) will host its 2019 Beef Up Cattlemen’s Conference scheduled for May 10, 2019 starting at 2:00 PM. The session starts with Registration and Exhibitors Displays, followed by Animal ID: new perspectives, Hank Hayes- Texas Animal Health Commission, Knowing Your Customer, Chris McClure Private Consultant, Creating native grasslands Christian Ebel- Hopkins County, Fifty shades of cattle health, Kevin Gray- 4G Veterinary Care and The Beef Industry Today, Randy Harp—Texas A&M Commerce followed by a Q&A portion and ends with a Steak Dinner. The program will be held at the Hopkins County Regional Civic Center Arena. The program is free for beef producers but registration is required by calling 903-449-6079 or email [email protected] to secure meal.

For more information on this or any other agricultural topic please contact the Hopkins County Extension Office at 903-885-3443.

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Mario Villarino DVM, Ph.D. Hopkins County Extension Agent for Ag and NR 1200B Houston Street Sulphur Springs, Texas 75482 903-885-3443

Author: KSST Webmaster

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