Spring has sprung!
May19

Spring has sprung!

Often the temperatures in May make me forget about how harsh our summers can be. With the presence of all this rain, our pastures are growing rapidly and a spike in clover populations and growth can be seen all over Northeast Texas. As I was talking about this with Hopkins Rains USDA personnel earlier in the week, I was quickly reminded how rapidly the condition can change if raining stops. All the sudden, moisture can change...

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Dandelions – Mario Villarino
May12

Dandelions – Mario Villarino

  One of the most important roles of extension education is to retrieve and share scientific knowledge recent or historical. My role as a county agent is to share with our community pertinent information in a timely manner. Because scientific knowledge created by extension services is not own by anyone, this information is considered unbiased and trustworthy, and since Extension does not benefit economically  from selling...

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Growing a Healthy Tomato Crop
May06

Growing a Healthy Tomato Crop

A common problem in tomato development is known as blossom end rot. Blossom end rot is a developmental disease of tomato fruits due to irregular watering during the growing cycle. The most common reason for this anomaly is irregular plant input of calcium during the plant growth. In calcium rich soils, the main reason for this is lack of even watering. Blossom end rot is observed as a darkened circular softening of the fruit at the...

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Cooler and wet weather: potential effects in your garden
Apr29

Cooler and wet weather: potential effects in your garden

The recent rain and lower than normal temperatures have made the best conditions for rose flowering. The earth kind roses in our backyards and parks are flowering as a response to the weather. With the onset of cooler temperatures and rainy weather, there is the possibility of threat to the health of area lawns. Dr. W.M Johnson, Horticultural Agent for Texas A&M AgriLife Extension wrote: The menace is known as brown patch which is...

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Dairy Management Protects the Environment by Mario Villarino
Apr22

Dairy Management Protects the Environment by Mario Villarino

Recent precipitation has got me concerned about the excessive water going into places it should not be. Ponds and lagoons have the tendency to overfill and excess water can take a toll in ditches and retention walls. Our large dairy operations have strict regulations to respond to rainy days just as the ones we had before. According to Texas A&M Extension publications, dairies, swine operations, beef cattle feedlots, and poultry...

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Good Problems to Have by Dr. Mario Villarino
Apr14

Good Problems to Have by Dr. Mario Villarino

Earlier in the week, a phone call of one of our hay producers was very interesting to me. As he shared with me his pasture situation after the rain, we started talking about the clover in his meadow. According to the rancher, his meadow had a large number of clovers in it. With the rain, he was having trouble getting his cattle to eat it. We talked about the need of “pushing” the clover with cattle and the benefits of high nutritional...

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Locust Trees by Mario Villarino
Apr08

Locust Trees by Mario Villarino

This week I visited the property of a recent producer of Hopkins County. The land, in desperate need of care was invaded with locust trees. The trees in the area were of different sizes, proof that those trees where there for several decades. Honey locust (Gleditisia triacanthosL.) is a native tree species also known as honey-shucks locust, sweet-locust, three-thorned acacia, sweet-bean or thorny locust. It has a natural range that...

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April showers!!!
Mar31

April showers!!!

The first days of spring has brought plenty of rain to Hopkins County. As temperature increase, it is important to take actions before our landscapes get out of control (and trust them, they will if you let them!). Texas A&M AgriLife Extension published the following recommendations for the month of April: a) Prune spring-flowering shrubs soon after flowering. Keep the natural shape of the plant in mind as you prune, and avoid...

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Planting Growing Season
Mar25

Planting Growing Season

As temperatures warm-up, our planting season take up and watching plant development as progresses is a fundamental tool to control diseases. Texas A&M AgriLife Extension information states that plant diseases can occur at any stage during the course of plant growth. The rapid, accurate diagnosis of the cause of a disease, along with the implementation of a rapid treatment, is essential to ensure the protection of the crop. Certain...

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Basic Home Vegetable Gardening Training
Mar12
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